Tennessine – Melting Point

Periodic Table of Elements - melting point
1
H

Hydrogen

14.01 K

2
He

Helium

0.95 K

3
Li

Lithium

453.7 K

4
Be

Beryllium

1570 K

5
B

Boron

2348 K

6
C

Carbon

3823 K

7
N

Nitrogen

63.1 K

8
O

Oxygen

54.8 K

9
F

Fluorine

53.5 K

10
Ne

Neon

24.6 K

11
Na

Sodium

370.9 K

12
Mg

Magnesium

923 K

13
Al

Aluminium

933.5 K

14
Si

Silicon

1687 K

15
P

Phosphorus

317.3 K

16
S

Sulfur

388.4 K

17
Cl

Chlorine

171.6 K

18
Ar

Argon

83.8 K

19
K

Potassium

336.5 K

20
Ca

Calcium

1115 K

21
Sc

Scandium

1814 K

22
Ti

Titanium

1941 K

23
V

Vanadium

2183 K

24
Cr

Chromium

2180 K

25
Mn

Manganese

1519 K

26
Fe

Iron

1811 K

27
Co

Cobalt

1768 K

28
Ni

Nickel

1728 K

29
Cu

Copper

1357.8 K

30
Zn

Zinc

692.7 K

31
Ga

Gallium

302.9 K

32
Ge

Germanium

1211.4 K

33
As

Arsenic

1090 K

34
Se

Selenium

494 K

35
Br

Bromine

265.8 K

36
Kr

Krypton

115.8 K

37
Rb

Rubidium

312.5 K

38
Sr

Strontium

1050 K

39
Y

Yttrium

1799 K

40
Zr

Zirconium

2128 K

41
Nb

Niobium

2750 K

42
Mo

Molybdenum

2896 K

43
Tc

Technetium

2430 K

44
Ru

Ruthenium

2607 K

45
Rh

Rhodium

2237 K

46
Pd

Palladium

1828.1 K

47
Ag

Silver

1234.9 K

48
Cd

Cadmium

594.2 K

49
In

Indium

429.8 K

50
Sn

Tin

505.1 K

51
Sb

Antimony

903.8 K

52
Te

Tellurium

722.6 K

53
I

Iodine

386.9 K

54
Xe

Xenon

161.3 K

55
Cs

Caesium

301.6 K

56
Ba

Barium

1000 K

57-71

 

Lanthanoids

 

72
Hf

Hafnium

2506 K

73
Ta

Tantalum

3290 K

74
W

Tungsten

3695 K

75
Re

Rhenium

3459 K

76
Os

Osmium

3306 K

77
Ir

Iridium

2739 K

78
Pt

Platinum

2041.4 K

79
Au

Gold

1337.3 K

80
Hg

Mercury

234.3 K

81
Tl

Thallium

577 K

82
Pb

Lead

600.6 K

83
Bi

Bismuth

544.4 K

84
Po

Polonium

527 K

85
At

Astatine

575 K

86
Rn

Radon

202 K

87
Fr

Francium

300 K

88
Ra

Radium

973 K

89-103

 

Actinoids

 

104
Rf

Rutherfordium

 

105
Db

Dubnium

 

106
Sg

Seaborgium

 

107
Bh

Bohrium

 

108
Hs

Hassium

 

109
Mt

Meitnerium

 

110
Ds

Darmstadtium

 

111
Rg

Roentgenium

 

112
Cn

Copernicium

 

113
Nh

Nihonium

 

114
Fl

Flerovium

 

115
Mc

Moscovium

 

116
Lv

Livermorium

 

117
Ts

Tennessine

 

118
Og

Oganesson

 

57
La

Lanthanum

1193 K

58
Ce

Cerium

1071 K

59
Pr

Praseodymium

1204 K

60
Nd

Neodymium

1294 K

61
Pm

Promethium

1373 K

62
Sm

Samarium

1345 K

63
Eu

Europium

1095 K

64
Gd

Gadolinium

1568 K

65
Tb

Terbium

1629 K

66
Dy

Dysprosium

1685 K

67
Ho

Holmium

1747 K

68
Er

Erbium

1770 K

69
Th

Thulium

1818 K

70
Yb

Ytterbium

1092 K

71
Lu

Lutetium

1936 K

89
Ac

Actinium

1323 K

90
Th

Thorium

2023 K

91
Pa

Protactinium

1845 K

92
U

Uranium

1408 K

93
Np

Neptunium

917 K

94
Pu

Plutonium

913 K

95
Am

Americium

1449 K

96
Cm

Curium

1618 K

97
Bk

Berkelium

1323 K

98
Cf

Californium

1173 K

99
Es

Einsteinium

1133 K

100
Fm

Fermium

1800 K

101
Md

Mendelevium

1100 K

102
No

Nobelium

1100 K

103
Lr

Lawrencium

1900 K

Tennessine – Melting Point

Melting point of Tennessine is –°C.

Note that, these points are associated with the standard atmospheric pressure.

In general, melting is a phase change of a substance from the solid to the liquid phase. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which this phase change occurs. The melting point also defines a condition in which the solid and liquid can exist in equilibrium. Adding a heat will convert the solid into a liquid with no temperature change. At the melting point the two phases of a substance, liquid and vapor, have identical free energies and therefore are equally likely to exist. Below the melting point, the solid is the more stable state of the two, whereas above the liquid form is preferred. The melting point of a substance depends on pressure and is usually specified at standard pressure. When considered as the temperature of the reverse change from liquid to solid, it is referred to as the freezing point or crystallization point.

See also: Melting Point Depression

The first theory explaining mechanism of melting in the bulk was proposed by Lindemann, who used vibration of atoms in the crystal to explain the melting transition. Solids are similar to liquids in that both are condensed states, with particles that are far closer together than those of a gas. The atoms in a solid are tightly bound to each other, either in a regular geometric lattice (crystalline solids, which include metals and ordinary ice) or irregularly (an amorphous solid such as common window glass), and are typically low in energy. The motion of individual atoms, ions, or molecules in a solid is restricted to vibrational motion about a fixed point. As a solid is heated, its particles vibrate more rapidly as the solid absorbs kinetic energy. At some point the amplitude of vibration becomes so large that the atoms start to invade the space of their nearest neighbors and disturb them and the melting process initiates. The melting point is the temperature at which the disruptive vibrations of the particles of the solid overcome the attractive forces operating within the solid.

As with boiling points, the melting point of a solid is dependent on the strength of those attractive forces. For example, sodium chloride  (NaCl) is an ionic compound that consists of a multitude of strong ionic bonds. Sodium chloride melts at  801°C. On the other hand, ice (solid H2O) is a molecular compound whose molecules are held together by hydrogen bonds, which is effectively a strong example of an interaction between two permanent dipoles. Though hydrogen bonds are the strongest of the intermolecular forces, the strength of hydrogen bonds is much less than that of ionic bonds. The melting point of ice is 0 °C.

Covalent bonds often result in the formation of small collections of better-connected atoms called molecules, which in solids and liquids are bound to other molecules by forces that are often much weaker than the covalent bonds that hold the molecules internally together. Such weak intermolecular bonds give organic molecular substances, such as waxes and oils, their soft bulk character, and their low melting points (in liquids, molecules must cease most structured or oriented contact with each other).

 

melting-and-boiling-point-chemical-elements-chart

Oganesson – Melting Point

Periodic Table of Elements - melting point
1
H

Hydrogen

14.01 K

2
He

Helium

0.95 K

3
Li

Lithium

453.7 K

4
Be

Beryllium

1570 K

5
B

Boron

2348 K

6
C

Carbon

3823 K

7
N

Nitrogen

63.1 K

8
O

Oxygen

54.8 K

9
F

Fluorine

53.5 K

10
Ne

Neon

24.6 K

11
Na

Sodium

370.9 K

12
Mg

Magnesium

923 K

13
Al

Aluminium

933.5 K

14
Si

Silicon

1687 K

15
P

Phosphorus

317.3 K

16
S

Sulfur

388.4 K

17
Cl

Chlorine

171.6 K

18
Ar

Argon

83.8 K

19
K

Potassium

336.5 K

20
Ca

Calcium

1115 K

21
Sc

Scandium

1814 K

22
Ti

Titanium

1941 K

23
V

Vanadium

2183 K

24
Cr

Chromium

2180 K

25
Mn

Manganese

1519 K

26
Fe

Iron

1811 K

27
Co

Cobalt

1768 K

28
Ni

Nickel

1728 K

29
Cu

Copper

1357.8 K

30
Zn

Zinc

692.7 K

31
Ga

Gallium

302.9 K

32
Ge

Germanium

1211.4 K

33
As

Arsenic

1090 K

34
Se

Selenium

494 K

35
Br

Bromine

265.8 K

36
Kr

Krypton

115.8 K

37
Rb

Rubidium

312.5 K

38
Sr

Strontium

1050 K

39
Y

Yttrium

1799 K

40
Zr

Zirconium

2128 K

41
Nb

Niobium

2750 K

42
Mo

Molybdenum

2896 K

43
Tc

Technetium

2430 K

44
Ru

Ruthenium

2607 K

45
Rh

Rhodium

2237 K

46
Pd

Palladium

1828.1 K

47
Ag

Silver

1234.9 K

48
Cd

Cadmium

594.2 K

49
In

Indium

429.8 K

50
Sn

Tin

505.1 K

51
Sb

Antimony

903.8 K

52
Te

Tellurium

722.6 K

53
I

Iodine

386.9 K

54
Xe

Xenon

161.3 K

55
Cs

Caesium

301.6 K

56
Ba

Barium

1000 K

57-71

 

Lanthanoids

 

72
Hf

Hafnium

2506 K

73
Ta

Tantalum

3290 K

74
W

Tungsten

3695 K

75
Re

Rhenium

3459 K

76
Os

Osmium

3306 K

77
Ir

Iridium

2739 K

78
Pt

Platinum

2041.4 K

79
Au

Gold

1337.3 K

80
Hg

Mercury

234.3 K

81
Tl

Thallium

577 K

82
Pb

Lead

600.6 K

83
Bi

Bismuth

544.4 K

84
Po

Polonium

527 K

85
At

Astatine

575 K

86
Rn

Radon

202 K

87
Fr

Francium

300 K

88
Ra

Radium

973 K

89-103

 

Actinoids

 

104
Rf

Rutherfordium

 

105
Db

Dubnium

 

106
Sg

Seaborgium

 

107
Bh

Bohrium

 

108
Hs

Hassium

 

109
Mt

Meitnerium

 

110
Ds

Darmstadtium

 

111
Rg

Roentgenium

 

112
Cn

Copernicium

 

113
Nh

Nihonium

 

114
Fl

Flerovium

 

115
Mc

Moscovium

 

116
Lv

Livermorium

 

117
Ts

Tennessine

 

118
Og

Oganesson

 

57
La

Lanthanum

1193 K

58
Ce

Cerium

1071 K

59
Pr

Praseodymium

1204 K

60
Nd

Neodymium

1294 K

61
Pm

Promethium

1373 K

62
Sm

Samarium

1345 K

63
Eu

Europium

1095 K

64
Gd

Gadolinium

1568 K

65
Tb

Terbium

1629 K

66
Dy

Dysprosium

1685 K

67
Ho

Holmium

1747 K

68
Er

Erbium

1770 K

69
Th

Thulium

1818 K

70
Yb

Ytterbium

1092 K

71
Lu

Lutetium

1936 K

89
Ac

Actinium

1323 K

90
Th

Thorium

2023 K

91
Pa

Protactinium

1845 K

92
U

Uranium

1408 K

93
Np

Neptunium

917 K

94
Pu

Plutonium

913 K

95
Am

Americium

1449 K

96
Cm

Curium

1618 K

97
Bk

Berkelium

1323 K

98
Cf

Californium

1173 K

99
Es

Einsteinium

1133 K

100
Fm

Fermium

1800 K

101
Md

Mendelevium

1100 K

102
No

Nobelium

1100 K

103
Lr

Lawrencium

1900 K

Oganesson – Melting Point

Melting point of Oganesson is –°C.

Note that, these points are associated with the standard atmospheric pressure.

In general, melting is a phase change of a substance from the solid to the liquid phase. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which this phase change occurs. The melting point also defines a condition in which the solid and liquid can exist in equilibrium. Adding a heat will convert the solid into a liquid with no temperature change. At the melting point the two phases of a substance, liquid and vapor, have identical free energies and therefore are equally likely to exist. Below the melting point, the solid is the more stable state of the two, whereas above the liquid form is preferred. The melting point of a substance depends on pressure and is usually specified at standard pressure. When considered as the temperature of the reverse change from liquid to solid, it is referred to as the freezing point or crystallization point.

See also: Melting Point Depression

The first theory explaining mechanism of melting in the bulk was proposed by Lindemann, who used vibration of atoms in the crystal to explain the melting transition. Solids are similar to liquids in that both are condensed states, with particles that are far closer together than those of a gas. The atoms in a solid are tightly bound to each other, either in a regular geometric lattice (crystalline solids, which include metals and ordinary ice) or irregularly (an amorphous solid such as common window glass), and are typically low in energy. The motion of individual atoms, ions, or molecules in a solid is restricted to vibrational motion about a fixed point. As a solid is heated, its particles vibrate more rapidly as the solid absorbs kinetic energy. At some point the amplitude of vibration becomes so large that the atoms start to invade the space of their nearest neighbors and disturb them and the melting process initiates. The melting point is the temperature at which the disruptive vibrations of the particles of the solid overcome the attractive forces operating within the solid.

As with boiling points, the melting point of a solid is dependent on the strength of those attractive forces. For example, sodium chloride  (NaCl) is an ionic compound that consists of a multitude of strong ionic bonds. Sodium chloride melts at  801°C. On the other hand, ice (solid H2O) is a molecular compound whose molecules are held together by hydrogen bonds, which is effectively a strong example of an interaction between two permanent dipoles. Though hydrogen bonds are the strongest of the intermolecular forces, the strength of hydrogen bonds is much less than that of ionic bonds. The melting point of ice is 0 °C.

Covalent bonds often result in the formation of small collections of better-connected atoms called molecules, which in solids and liquids are bound to other molecules by forces that are often much weaker than the covalent bonds that hold the molecules internally together. Such weak intermolecular bonds give organic molecular substances, such as waxes and oils, their soft bulk character, and their low melting points (in liquids, molecules must cease most structured or oriented contact with each other).

 

melting-and-boiling-point-chemical-elements-chart

Moscovium – Melting Point

Periodic Table of Elements - melting point
1
H

Hydrogen

14.01 K

2
He

Helium

0.95 K

3
Li

Lithium

453.7 K

4
Be

Beryllium

1570 K

5
B

Boron

2348 K

6
C

Carbon

3823 K

7
N

Nitrogen

63.1 K

8
O

Oxygen

54.8 K

9
F

Fluorine

53.5 K

10
Ne

Neon

24.6 K

11
Na

Sodium

370.9 K

12
Mg

Magnesium

923 K

13
Al

Aluminium

933.5 K

14
Si

Silicon

1687 K

15
P

Phosphorus

317.3 K

16
S

Sulfur

388.4 K

17
Cl

Chlorine

171.6 K

18
Ar

Argon

83.8 K

19
K

Potassium

336.5 K

20
Ca

Calcium

1115 K

21
Sc

Scandium

1814 K

22
Ti

Titanium

1941 K

23
V

Vanadium

2183 K

24
Cr

Chromium

2180 K

25
Mn

Manganese

1519 K

26
Fe

Iron

1811 K

27
Co

Cobalt

1768 K

28
Ni

Nickel

1728 K

29
Cu

Copper

1357.8 K

30
Zn

Zinc

692.7 K

31
Ga

Gallium

302.9 K

32
Ge

Germanium

1211.4 K

33
As

Arsenic

1090 K

34
Se

Selenium

494 K

35
Br

Bromine

265.8 K

36
Kr

Krypton

115.8 K

37
Rb

Rubidium

312.5 K

38
Sr

Strontium

1050 K

39
Y

Yttrium

1799 K

40
Zr

Zirconium

2128 K

41
Nb

Niobium

2750 K

42
Mo

Molybdenum

2896 K

43
Tc

Technetium

2430 K

44
Ru

Ruthenium

2607 K

45
Rh

Rhodium

2237 K

46
Pd

Palladium

1828.1 K

47
Ag

Silver

1234.9 K

48
Cd

Cadmium

594.2 K

49
In

Indium

429.8 K

50
Sn

Tin

505.1 K

51
Sb

Antimony

903.8 K

52
Te

Tellurium

722.6 K

53
I

Iodine

386.9 K

54
Xe

Xenon

161.3 K

55
Cs

Caesium

301.6 K

56
Ba

Barium

1000 K

57-71

 

Lanthanoids

 

72
Hf

Hafnium

2506 K

73
Ta

Tantalum

3290 K

74
W

Tungsten

3695 K

75
Re

Rhenium

3459 K

76
Os

Osmium

3306 K

77
Ir

Iridium

2739 K

78
Pt

Platinum

2041.4 K

79
Au

Gold

1337.3 K

80
Hg

Mercury

234.3 K

81
Tl

Thallium

577 K

82
Pb

Lead

600.6 K

83
Bi

Bismuth

544.4 K

84
Po

Polonium

527 K

85
At

Astatine

575 K

86
Rn

Radon

202 K

87
Fr

Francium

300 K

88
Ra

Radium

973 K

89-103

 

Actinoids

 

104
Rf

Rutherfordium

 

105
Db

Dubnium

 

106
Sg

Seaborgium

 

107
Bh

Bohrium

 

108
Hs

Hassium

 

109
Mt

Meitnerium

 

110
Ds

Darmstadtium

 

111
Rg

Roentgenium

 

112
Cn

Copernicium

 

113
Nh

Nihonium

 

114
Fl

Flerovium

 

115
Mc

Moscovium

 

116
Lv

Livermorium

 

117
Ts

Tennessine

 

118
Og

Oganesson

 

57
La

Lanthanum

1193 K

58
Ce

Cerium

1071 K

59
Pr

Praseodymium

1204 K

60
Nd

Neodymium

1294 K

61
Pm

Promethium

1373 K

62
Sm

Samarium

1345 K

63
Eu

Europium

1095 K

64
Gd

Gadolinium

1568 K

65
Tb

Terbium

1629 K

66
Dy

Dysprosium

1685 K

67
Ho

Holmium

1747 K

68
Er

Erbium

1770 K

69
Th

Thulium

1818 K

70
Yb

Ytterbium

1092 K

71
Lu

Lutetium

1936 K

89
Ac

Actinium

1323 K

90
Th

Thorium

2023 K

91
Pa

Protactinium

1845 K

92
U

Uranium

1408 K

93
Np

Neptunium

917 K

94
Pu

Plutonium

913 K

95
Am

Americium

1449 K

96
Cm

Curium

1618 K

97
Bk

Berkelium

1323 K

98
Cf

Californium

1173 K

99
Es

Einsteinium

1133 K

100
Fm

Fermium

1800 K

101
Md

Mendelevium

1100 K

102
No

Nobelium

1100 K

103
Lr

Lawrencium

1900 K

Moscovium – Melting Point

Melting point of Moscovium is 400°C.

Note that, these points are associated with the standard atmospheric pressure.

In general, melting is a phase change of a substance from the solid to the liquid phase. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which this phase change occurs. The melting point also defines a condition in which the solid and liquid can exist in equilibrium. Adding a heat will convert the solid into a liquid with no temperature change. At the melting point the two phases of a substance, liquid and vapor, have identical free energies and therefore are equally likely to exist. Below the melting point, the solid is the more stable state of the two, whereas above the liquid form is preferred. The melting point of a substance depends on pressure and is usually specified at standard pressure. When considered as the temperature of the reverse change from liquid to solid, it is referred to as the freezing point or crystallization point.

See also: Melting Point Depression

The first theory explaining mechanism of melting in the bulk was proposed by Lindemann, who used vibration of atoms in the crystal to explain the melting transition. Solids are similar to liquids in that both are condensed states, with particles that are far closer together than those of a gas. The atoms in a solid are tightly bound to each other, either in a regular geometric lattice (crystalline solids, which include metals and ordinary ice) or irregularly (an amorphous solid such as common window glass), and are typically low in energy. The motion of individual atoms, ions, or molecules in a solid is restricted to vibrational motion about a fixed point. As a solid is heated, its particles vibrate more rapidly as the solid absorbs kinetic energy. At some point the amplitude of vibration becomes so large that the atoms start to invade the space of their nearest neighbors and disturb them and the melting process initiates. The melting point is the temperature at which the disruptive vibrations of the particles of the solid overcome the attractive forces operating within the solid.

As with boiling points, the melting point of a solid is dependent on the strength of those attractive forces. For example, sodium chloride  (NaCl) is an ionic compound that consists of a multitude of strong ionic bonds. Sodium chloride melts at  801°C. On the other hand, ice (solid H2O) is a molecular compound whose molecules are held together by hydrogen bonds, which is effectively a strong example of an interaction between two permanent dipoles. Though hydrogen bonds are the strongest of the intermolecular forces, the strength of hydrogen bonds is much less than that of ionic bonds. The melting point of ice is 0 °C.

Covalent bonds often result in the formation of small collections of better-connected atoms called molecules, which in solids and liquids are bound to other molecules by forces that are often much weaker than the covalent bonds that hold the molecules internally together. Such weak intermolecular bonds give organic molecular substances, such as waxes and oils, their soft bulk character, and their low melting points (in liquids, molecules must cease most structured or oriented contact with each other).

 

melting-and-boiling-point-chemical-elements-chart

Livermorium – Melting Point

Periodic Table of Elements - melting point
1
H

Hydrogen

14.01 K

2
He

Helium

0.95 K

3
Li

Lithium

453.7 K

4
Be

Beryllium

1570 K

5
B

Boron

2348 K

6
C

Carbon

3823 K

7
N

Nitrogen

63.1 K

8
O

Oxygen

54.8 K

9
F

Fluorine

53.5 K

10
Ne

Neon

24.6 K

11
Na

Sodium

370.9 K

12
Mg

Magnesium

923 K

13
Al

Aluminium

933.5 K

14
Si

Silicon

1687 K

15
P

Phosphorus

317.3 K

16
S

Sulfur

388.4 K

17
Cl

Chlorine

171.6 K

18
Ar

Argon

83.8 K

19
K

Potassium

336.5 K

20
Ca

Calcium

1115 K

21
Sc

Scandium

1814 K

22
Ti

Titanium

1941 K

23
V

Vanadium

2183 K

24
Cr

Chromium

2180 K

25
Mn

Manganese

1519 K

26
Fe

Iron

1811 K

27
Co

Cobalt

1768 K

28
Ni

Nickel

1728 K

29
Cu

Copper

1357.8 K

30
Zn

Zinc

692.7 K

31
Ga

Gallium

302.9 K

32
Ge

Germanium

1211.4 K

33
As

Arsenic

1090 K

34
Se

Selenium

494 K

35
Br

Bromine

265.8 K

36
Kr

Krypton

115.8 K

37
Rb

Rubidium

312.5 K

38
Sr

Strontium

1050 K

39
Y

Yttrium

1799 K

40
Zr

Zirconium

2128 K

41
Nb

Niobium

2750 K

42
Mo

Molybdenum

2896 K

43
Tc

Technetium

2430 K

44
Ru

Ruthenium

2607 K

45
Rh

Rhodium

2237 K

46
Pd

Palladium

1828.1 K

47
Ag

Silver

1234.9 K

48
Cd

Cadmium

594.2 K

49
In

Indium

429.8 K

50
Sn

Tin

505.1 K

51
Sb

Antimony

903.8 K

52
Te

Tellurium

722.6 K

53
I

Iodine

386.9 K

54
Xe

Xenon

161.3 K

55
Cs

Caesium

301.6 K

56
Ba

Barium

1000 K

57-71

 

Lanthanoids

 

72
Hf

Hafnium

2506 K

73
Ta

Tantalum

3290 K

74
W

Tungsten

3695 K

75
Re

Rhenium

3459 K

76
Os

Osmium

3306 K

77
Ir

Iridium

2739 K

78
Pt

Platinum

2041.4 K

79
Au

Gold

1337.3 K

80
Hg

Mercury

234.3 K

81
Tl

Thallium

577 K

82
Pb

Lead

600.6 K

83
Bi

Bismuth

544.4 K

84
Po

Polonium

527 K

85
At

Astatine

575 K

86
Rn

Radon

202 K

87
Fr

Francium

300 K

88
Ra

Radium

973 K

89-103

 

Actinoids

 

104
Rf

Rutherfordium

 

105
Db

Dubnium

 

106
Sg

Seaborgium

 

107
Bh

Bohrium

 

108
Hs

Hassium

 

109
Mt

Meitnerium

 

110
Ds

Darmstadtium

 

111
Rg

Roentgenium

 

112
Cn

Copernicium

 

113
Nh

Nihonium

 

114
Fl

Flerovium

 

115
Mc

Moscovium

 

116
Lv

Livermorium

 

117
Ts

Tennessine

 

118
Og

Oganesson

 

57
La

Lanthanum

1193 K

58
Ce

Cerium

1071 K

59
Pr

Praseodymium

1204 K

60
Nd

Neodymium

1294 K

61
Pm

Promethium

1373 K

62
Sm

Samarium

1345 K

63
Eu

Europium

1095 K

64
Gd

Gadolinium

1568 K

65
Tb

Terbium

1629 K

66
Dy

Dysprosium

1685 K

67
Ho

Holmium

1747 K

68
Er

Erbium

1770 K

69
Th

Thulium

1818 K

70
Yb

Ytterbium

1092 K

71
Lu

Lutetium

1936 K

89
Ac

Actinium

1323 K

90
Th

Thorium

2023 K

91
Pa

Protactinium

1845 K

92
U

Uranium

1408 K

93
Np

Neptunium

917 K

94
Pu

Plutonium

913 K

95
Am

Americium

1449 K

96
Cm

Curium

1618 K

97
Bk

Berkelium

1323 K

98
Cf

Californium

1173 K

99
Es

Einsteinium

1133 K

100
Fm

Fermium

1800 K

101
Md

Mendelevium

1100 K

102
No

Nobelium

1100 K

103
Lr

Lawrencium

1900 K

Livermorium – Melting Point

Melting point of Livermorium is –°C.

Note that, these points are associated with the standard atmospheric pressure.

In general, melting is a phase change of a substance from the solid to the liquid phase. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which this phase change occurs. The melting point also defines a condition in which the solid and liquid can exist in equilibrium. Adding a heat will convert the solid into a liquid with no temperature change. At the melting point the two phases of a substance, liquid and vapor, have identical free energies and therefore are equally likely to exist. Below the melting point, the solid is the more stable state of the two, whereas above the liquid form is preferred. The melting point of a substance depends on pressure and is usually specified at standard pressure. When considered as the temperature of the reverse change from liquid to solid, it is referred to as the freezing point or crystallization point.

See also: Melting Point Depression

The first theory explaining mechanism of melting in the bulk was proposed by Lindemann, who used vibration of atoms in the crystal to explain the melting transition. Solids are similar to liquids in that both are condensed states, with particles that are far closer together than those of a gas. The atoms in a solid are tightly bound to each other, either in a regular geometric lattice (crystalline solids, which include metals and ordinary ice) or irregularly (an amorphous solid such as common window glass), and are typically low in energy. The motion of individual atoms, ions, or molecules in a solid is restricted to vibrational motion about a fixed point. As a solid is heated, its particles vibrate more rapidly as the solid absorbs kinetic energy. At some point the amplitude of vibration becomes so large that the atoms start to invade the space of their nearest neighbors and disturb them and the melting process initiates. The melting point is the temperature at which the disruptive vibrations of the particles of the solid overcome the attractive forces operating within the solid.

As with boiling points, the melting point of a solid is dependent on the strength of those attractive forces. For example, sodium chloride  (NaCl) is an ionic compound that consists of a multitude of strong ionic bonds. Sodium chloride melts at  801°C. On the other hand, ice (solid H2O) is a molecular compound whose molecules are held together by hydrogen bonds, which is effectively a strong example of an interaction between two permanent dipoles. Though hydrogen bonds are the strongest of the intermolecular forces, the strength of hydrogen bonds is much less than that of ionic bonds. The melting point of ice is 0 °C.

Covalent bonds often result in the formation of small collections of better-connected atoms called molecules, which in solids and liquids are bound to other molecules by forces that are often much weaker than the covalent bonds that hold the molecules internally together. Such weak intermolecular bonds give organic molecular substances, such as waxes and oils, their soft bulk character, and their low melting points (in liquids, molecules must cease most structured or oriented contact with each other).

 

melting-and-boiling-point-chemical-elements-chart

Nihonium – Melting Point

Periodic Table of Elements - melting point
1
H

Hydrogen

14.01 K

2
He

Helium

0.95 K

3
Li

Lithium

453.7 K

4
Be

Beryllium

1570 K

5
B

Boron

2348 K

6
C

Carbon

3823 K

7
N

Nitrogen

63.1 K

8
O

Oxygen

54.8 K

9
F

Fluorine

53.5 K

10
Ne

Neon

24.6 K

11
Na

Sodium

370.9 K

12
Mg

Magnesium

923 K

13
Al

Aluminium

933.5 K

14
Si

Silicon

1687 K

15
P

Phosphorus

317.3 K

16
S

Sulfur

388.4 K

17
Cl

Chlorine

171.6 K

18
Ar

Argon

83.8 K

19
K

Potassium

336.5 K

20
Ca

Calcium

1115 K

21
Sc

Scandium

1814 K

22
Ti

Titanium

1941 K

23
V

Vanadium

2183 K

24
Cr

Chromium

2180 K

25
Mn

Manganese

1519 K

26
Fe

Iron

1811 K

27
Co

Cobalt

1768 K

28
Ni

Nickel

1728 K

29
Cu

Copper

1357.8 K

30
Zn

Zinc

692.7 K

31
Ga

Gallium

302.9 K

32
Ge

Germanium

1211.4 K

33
As

Arsenic

1090 K

34
Se

Selenium

494 K

35
Br

Bromine

265.8 K

36
Kr

Krypton

115.8 K

37
Rb

Rubidium

312.5 K

38
Sr

Strontium

1050 K

39
Y

Yttrium

1799 K

40
Zr

Zirconium

2128 K

41
Nb

Niobium

2750 K

42
Mo

Molybdenum

2896 K

43
Tc

Technetium

2430 K

44
Ru

Ruthenium

2607 K

45
Rh

Rhodium

2237 K

46
Pd

Palladium

1828.1 K

47
Ag

Silver

1234.9 K

48
Cd

Cadmium

594.2 K

49
In

Indium

429.8 K

50
Sn

Tin

505.1 K

51
Sb

Antimony

903.8 K

52
Te

Tellurium

722.6 K

53
I

Iodine

386.9 K

54
Xe

Xenon

161.3 K

55
Cs

Caesium

301.6 K

56
Ba

Barium

1000 K

57-71

 

Lanthanoids

 

72
Hf

Hafnium

2506 K

73
Ta

Tantalum

3290 K

74
W

Tungsten

3695 K

75
Re

Rhenium

3459 K

76
Os

Osmium

3306 K

77
Ir

Iridium

2739 K

78
Pt

Platinum

2041.4 K

79
Au

Gold

1337.3 K

80
Hg

Mercury

234.3 K

81
Tl

Thallium

577 K

82
Pb

Lead

600.6 K

83
Bi

Bismuth

544.4 K

84
Po

Polonium

527 K

85
At

Astatine

575 K

86
Rn

Radon

202 K

87
Fr

Francium

300 K

88
Ra

Radium

973 K

89-103

 

Actinoids

 

104
Rf

Rutherfordium

 

105
Db

Dubnium

 

106
Sg

Seaborgium

 

107
Bh

Bohrium

 

108
Hs

Hassium

 

109
Mt

Meitnerium

 

110
Ds

Darmstadtium

 

111
Rg

Roentgenium

 

112
Cn

Copernicium

 

113
Nh

Nihonium

 

114
Fl

Flerovium

 

115
Mc

Moscovium

 

116
Lv

Livermorium

 

117
Ts

Tennessine

 

118
Og

Oganesson

 

57
La

Lanthanum

1193 K

58
Ce

Cerium

1071 K

59
Pr

Praseodymium

1204 K

60
Nd

Neodymium

1294 K

61
Pm

Promethium

1373 K

62
Sm

Samarium

1345 K

63
Eu

Europium

1095 K

64
Gd

Gadolinium

1568 K

65
Tb

Terbium

1629 K

66
Dy

Dysprosium

1685 K

67
Ho

Holmium

1747 K

68
Er

Erbium

1770 K

69
Th

Thulium

1818 K

70
Yb

Ytterbium

1092 K

71
Lu

Lutetium

1936 K

89
Ac

Actinium

1323 K

90
Th

Thorium

2023 K

91
Pa

Protactinium

1845 K

92
U

Uranium

1408 K

93
Np

Neptunium

917 K

94
Pu

Plutonium

913 K

95
Am

Americium

1449 K

96
Cm

Curium

1618 K

97
Bk

Berkelium

1323 K

98
Cf

Californium

1173 K

99
Es

Einsteinium

1133 K

100
Fm

Fermium

1800 K

101
Md

Mendelevium

1100 K

102
No

Nobelium

1100 K

103
Lr

Lawrencium

1900 K

Nihonium – Melting Point

Melting point of Nihonium is 430°C.

Note that, these points are associated with the standard atmospheric pressure.

In general, melting is a phase change of a substance from the solid to the liquid phase. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which this phase change occurs. The melting point also defines a condition in which the solid and liquid can exist in equilibrium. Adding a heat will convert the solid into a liquid with no temperature change. At the melting point the two phases of a substance, liquid and vapor, have identical free energies and therefore are equally likely to exist. Below the melting point, the solid is the more stable state of the two, whereas above the liquid form is preferred. The melting point of a substance depends on pressure and is usually specified at standard pressure. When considered as the temperature of the reverse change from liquid to solid, it is referred to as the freezing point or crystallization point.

See also: Melting Point Depression

The first theory explaining mechanism of melting in the bulk was proposed by Lindemann, who used vibration of atoms in the crystal to explain the melting transition. Solids are similar to liquids in that both are condensed states, with particles that are far closer together than those of a gas. The atoms in a solid are tightly bound to each other, either in a regular geometric lattice (crystalline solids, which include metals and ordinary ice) or irregularly (an amorphous solid such as common window glass), and are typically low in energy. The motion of individual atoms, ions, or molecules in a solid is restricted to vibrational motion about a fixed point. As a solid is heated, its particles vibrate more rapidly as the solid absorbs kinetic energy. At some point the amplitude of vibration becomes so large that the atoms start to invade the space of their nearest neighbors and disturb them and the melting process initiates. The melting point is the temperature at which the disruptive vibrations of the particles of the solid overcome the attractive forces operating within the solid.

As with boiling points, the melting point of a solid is dependent on the strength of those attractive forces. For example, sodium chloride  (NaCl) is an ionic compound that consists of a multitude of strong ionic bonds. Sodium chloride melts at  801°C. On the other hand, ice (solid H2O) is a molecular compound whose molecules are held together by hydrogen bonds, which is effectively a strong example of an interaction between two permanent dipoles. Though hydrogen bonds are the strongest of the intermolecular forces, the strength of hydrogen bonds is much less than that of ionic bonds. The melting point of ice is 0 °C.

Covalent bonds often result in the formation of small collections of better-connected atoms called molecules, which in solids and liquids are bound to other molecules by forces that are often much weaker than the covalent bonds that hold the molecules internally together. Such weak intermolecular bonds give organic molecular substances, such as waxes and oils, their soft bulk character, and their low melting points (in liquids, molecules must cease most structured or oriented contact with each other).

 

melting-and-boiling-point-chemical-elements-chart

Flerovium – Melting Point

Periodic Table of Elements - melting point
1
H

Hydrogen

14.01 K

2
He

Helium

0.95 K

3
Li

Lithium

453.7 K

4
Be

Beryllium

1570 K

5
B

Boron

2348 K

6
C

Carbon

3823 K

7
N

Nitrogen

63.1 K

8
O

Oxygen

54.8 K

9
F

Fluorine

53.5 K

10
Ne

Neon

24.6 K

11
Na

Sodium

370.9 K

12
Mg

Magnesium

923 K

13
Al

Aluminium

933.5 K

14
Si

Silicon

1687 K

15
P

Phosphorus

317.3 K

16
S

Sulfur

388.4 K

17
Cl

Chlorine

171.6 K

18
Ar

Argon

83.8 K

19
K

Potassium

336.5 K

20
Ca

Calcium

1115 K

21
Sc

Scandium

1814 K

22
Ti

Titanium

1941 K

23
V

Vanadium

2183 K

24
Cr

Chromium

2180 K

25
Mn

Manganese

1519 K

26
Fe

Iron

1811 K

27
Co

Cobalt

1768 K

28
Ni

Nickel

1728 K

29
Cu

Copper

1357.8 K

30
Zn

Zinc

692.7 K

31
Ga

Gallium

302.9 K

32
Ge

Germanium

1211.4 K

33
As

Arsenic

1090 K

34
Se

Selenium

494 K

35
Br

Bromine

265.8 K

36
Kr

Krypton

115.8 K

37
Rb

Rubidium

312.5 K

38
Sr

Strontium

1050 K

39
Y

Yttrium

1799 K

40
Zr

Zirconium

2128 K

41
Nb

Niobium

2750 K

42
Mo

Molybdenum

2896 K

43
Tc

Technetium

2430 K

44
Ru

Ruthenium

2607 K

45
Rh

Rhodium

2237 K

46
Pd

Palladium

1828.1 K

47
Ag

Silver

1234.9 K

48
Cd

Cadmium

594.2 K

49
In

Indium

429.8 K

50
Sn

Tin

505.1 K

51
Sb

Antimony

903.8 K

52
Te

Tellurium

722.6 K

53
I

Iodine

386.9 K

54
Xe

Xenon

161.3 K

55
Cs

Caesium

301.6 K

56
Ba

Barium

1000 K

57-71

 

Lanthanoids

 

72
Hf

Hafnium

2506 K

73
Ta

Tantalum

3290 K

74
W

Tungsten

3695 K

75
Re

Rhenium

3459 K

76
Os

Osmium

3306 K

77
Ir

Iridium

2739 K

78
Pt

Platinum

2041.4 K

79
Au

Gold

1337.3 K

80
Hg

Mercury

234.3 K

81
Tl

Thallium

577 K

82
Pb

Lead

600.6 K

83
Bi

Bismuth

544.4 K

84
Po

Polonium

527 K

85
At

Astatine

575 K

86
Rn

Radon

202 K

87
Fr

Francium

300 K

88
Ra

Radium

973 K

89-103

 

Actinoids

 

104
Rf

Rutherfordium

 

105
Db

Dubnium

 

106
Sg

Seaborgium

 

107
Bh

Bohrium

 

108
Hs

Hassium

 

109
Mt

Meitnerium

 

110
Ds

Darmstadtium

 

111
Rg

Roentgenium

 

112
Cn

Copernicium

 

113
Nh

Nihonium

 

114
Fl

Flerovium

 

115
Mc

Moscovium

 

116
Lv

Livermorium

 

117
Ts

Tennessine

 

118
Og

Oganesson

 

57
La

Lanthanum

1193 K

58
Ce

Cerium

1071 K

59
Pr

Praseodymium

1204 K

60
Nd

Neodymium

1294 K

61
Pm

Promethium

1373 K

62
Sm

Samarium

1345 K

63
Eu

Europium

1095 K

64
Gd

Gadolinium

1568 K

65
Tb

Terbium

1629 K

66
Dy

Dysprosium

1685 K

67
Ho

Holmium

1747 K

68
Er

Erbium

1770 K

69
Th

Thulium

1818 K

70
Yb

Ytterbium

1092 K

71
Lu

Lutetium

1936 K

89
Ac

Actinium

1323 K

90
Th

Thorium

2023 K

91
Pa

Protactinium

1845 K

92
U

Uranium

1408 K

93
Np

Neptunium

917 K

94
Pu

Plutonium

913 K

95
Am

Americium

1449 K

96
Cm

Curium

1618 K

97
Bk

Berkelium

1323 K

98
Cf

Californium

1173 K

99
Es

Einsteinium

1133 K

100
Fm

Fermium

1800 K

101
Md

Mendelevium

1100 K

102
No

Nobelium

1100 K

103
Lr

Lawrencium

1900 K

Flerovium – Melting Point

Melting point of Flerovium is –°C.

Note that, these points are associated with the standard atmospheric pressure.

In general, melting is a phase change of a substance from the solid to the liquid phase. The melting point of a substance is the temperature at which this phase change occurs. The melting point also defines a condition in which the solid and liquid can exist in equilibrium. Adding a heat will convert the solid into a liquid with no temperature change. At the melting point the two phases of a substance, liquid and vapor, have identical free energies and therefore are equally likely to exist. Below the melting point, the solid is the more stable state of the two, whereas above the liquid form is preferred. The melting point of a substance depends on pressure and is usually specified at standard pressure. When considered as the temperature of the reverse change from liquid to solid, it is referred to as the freezing point or crystallization point.

See also: Melting Point Depression

The first theory explaining mechanism of melting in the bulk was proposed by Lindemann, who used vibration of atoms in the crystal to explain the melting transition. Solids are similar to liquids in that both are condensed states, with particles that are far closer together than those of a gas. The atoms in a solid are tightly bound to each other, either in a regular geometric lattice (crystalline solids, which include metals and ordinary ice) or irregularly (an amorphous solid such as common window glass), and are typically low in energy. The motion of individual atoms, ions, or molecules in a solid is restricted to vibrational motion about a fixed point. As a solid is heated, its particles vibrate more rapidly as the solid absorbs kinetic energy. At some point the amplitude of vibration becomes so large that the atoms start to invade the space of their nearest neighbors and disturb them and the melting process initiates. The melting point is the temperature at which the disruptive vibrations of the particles of the solid overcome the attractive forces operating within the solid.

As with boiling points, the melting point of a solid is dependent on the strength of those attractive forces. For example, sodium chloride  (NaCl) is an ionic compound that consists of a multitude of strong ionic bonds. Sodium chloride melts at  801°C. On the other hand, ice (solid H2O) is a molecular compound whose molecules are held together by hydrogen bonds, which is effectively a strong example of an interaction between two permanent dipoles. Though hydrogen bonds are the strongest of the intermolecular forces, the strength of hydrogen bonds is much less than that of ionic bonds. The melting point of ice is 0 °C.

Covalent bonds often result in the formation of small collections of better-connected atoms called molecules, which in solids and liquids are bound to other molecules by forces that are often much weaker than the covalent bonds that hold the molecules internally together. Such weak intermolecular bonds give organic molecular substances, such as waxes and oils, their soft bulk character, and their low melting points (in liquids, molecules must cease most structured or oriented contact with each other).

 

melting-and-boiling-point-chemical-elements-chart